Imām al-Bayhaqī on Evidence for the Existence of the Creator

Below we present a translation from Imām al-Bayhaqī’s celebrated work on Sunnī ‘aqīdah, al-I‘tiqād wa l-Hidāyah ilā Sabīl al-Rashād. In this passage, al-Bayhaqī (may Allāh have mercy on him) discusses the evidential basis on which a Muslim premises his faith. He discusses two basic types of thought processes (nazar) that lead one to believe in Allāh:

  1. First, deliberating on the created order, the heavens, the earth and the wonders of one’s own creation, and deducing from that the presence of a Powerful, Intelligent, Conscious, Wise and All-Knowing Creator and Fashioner.
  2. And second, reasoning from the miracles produced at the hands of the prophets – peace be upon them – and deducing thereby their honesty and integrity in everything they relate about the unseen realm, including the existence of the Creator and His eternal attributes. Continue Reading

The Hadiths Cited by the Early Hanafi Fuqaha

Some people have the misunderstanding that the early Hanafī scholars whose books are in wide use today, like Shams al-A’immah al-Sarakhsī (d. 490 H), Malik al-‘Ulamā’ al-Kāsānī (d. 587 H) and Burhān al-Dīn al-Marghīnānī (d. 593), were unacquainted with hadīth. They base this on the absence of many hadīths quoted in their works in the available hadīth collections or their apparent weakness. These early scholars, however, took hadīths not only from the well-known collections, but also from the works of the earlier Hanafī ‘ulamā’, many of which have not reached us today. The narrations are found in these earlier works generally with their full chains of transmission. Hence, one may not dismiss the hadīths mentioned in al-Hidāyah, al-Mabsūt, al-Badā‘i’ etc. as baseless or forged merely on the grounds that they are not found in the available collections of hadīth. Continue Reading

Happy British Muslims Video

QUESTION

There’s been a recent video released and participated in by many notable British ‘practising’ Muslims termed ‘Happy British Muslims’.

Perhaps the most concerning feature (for some of us at least)  is that a prominent UK scholar is featured in it. He has since gone on record to say,”I’m delighted to see the outcome of the Happy British Muslims video, which has unlocked a remarkable tide of goodwill around the world, and significantly tilted the image of Muslims among many sceptics. Islamophobes must be grinding their teeth to see Muslims of different races and age-groups united by happiness. No one will produce a Sharia argument against jumping for joy!”

Could you please explain if there are any ‘sharia arguments’ that are violated in this video? Continue Reading

Question on Qasr and Watn Asli

QUESTION

I was born in a place which is 100 kms away from Hyderabad, then my family migrated to Hyderabad after my birth. The time I stayed at my birth location is not known to me.My family purchased a house in Hyderabad and we all shifted to Hyderababd. I have been there for about 24 yrs (approx). Now I am working in Trivandrum, Kerala which is about 1000 kms from Hyderabad.If I go to Hyderabad for less than 15 days, do I need to perform Qasar in Hyderabad ?

If I go to my birth place for less than 15 days, do I need to perform Qasar? Continue Reading

A Reply to the Essay, “Perspective on Trimming/Shaving beard”

Bismillāhir Rahmānir Rahīm

In the following, we will address a 9-page essay authored by Sheikh Hategekimana Hassan of Botswana called, “Perspective on Trimming/Shaving beard.”[1] Sheikh Hategekimana attempts to show that growing the beard is not a precept of religion or Sharī‘ah, but merely a recommended cultural practice inherited from Rasūlullāh (sallAllāhu ‘alayhi wasallam). He further argues that there is no sin in shaving the beard, and the widely-held notion that a person who shaves his beard should not be appointed an imam is an innovation in Islamic thought with no basis in earlier jurisprudential writings. Continue Reading

The Obligation of Adhering to a Single Madhhab in all its Rulings

If the obligation of a non-mujtahid is only to follow, or make taqlid, of qualified mujtahids, why do scholars insist on the added obligation of restricting one’s taqlid to a single madhhab?

The paper linked below addresses this question, providing a detailed explanation for the necessity of adhering to a single madhhab in all its rulings.

The obligation and its legal basis are supported by statements and opinions from major early authorities across the recognised schools of jurisprudence. It is argued that this ruling is not only more sound in the present context, but is also supported by strong positions from within each of the four madhhabs, with some of the early scholars having quoted consensus.

Imam al-Bayhaqi: The Greatest Name of Allah

There is some controversy amongst the scholars of Sharī‘ah regarding the etymology of the name “Allāh.” Some scholars assert that the name “Allāh” is a derived noun, consisting of the definite particle al (the) and the noun, ilāh (god) – meaning, “The God” –, while other scholars argued that it is a non-derived proper name for the Creator of all things. Continue Reading